test farm IE - 10 May 2012 (Offer For Sale)

Fiji


( For more information please call: Santo Obeid @ +9613001555 +96170422777 )

Listing Details

Reference: 6346
Sell Type: For Sale
List Price: 100 $
Date Listed: 10/May/2012

Description

When it comes to filling out forms on a mobile phone, I have observed many users running into a similar experience, merely less painful in its physical aspect. Many elements within a mobile form affect how smoothly users will get to a service or product hiding behind a form of any kind. There are several factors that can be considered to be stumbling blocks throughout the journey of filling out a form. Specifically on a portable device, this journey is complicated by the fact that we have to consider contextual parameters such as time, location, or limited input options, in comparison to a firm desktop experience. In this post we will look at the most common stumbling blocks for mobile devices. Moreover, I will discuss design strategies to avoid stumbling blocks and to facilitate a safe and quick stroll through forms for mobile users. Help Users Stay On The Right Path Some might say that elegantly designed forms can be compared to the likes of an efficient traffic system—as soon as you enter the road, you also enter a world of permanent and dynamic guidance that helps navigate you safely to your final destination. For example, the crosswalk signals tell you when it is okay to cross the street, just as the street signs signal the names of the streets that you are on. Street lights are also provided to help you navigate through difficult terrain in the dark. Keeping in mind your ultimate destination, you ultimately decide where to go, step by step. Road signs present your options and point out limitations. You can follow the traffic, take a short cut, or obey the navigation system on your phone. In this situation, comprehensible and timely feedback is vital. The same applies to mobile form design. Signposts and immediate feedback encourage users to complete a form. Although inputting data on a mobile device can be very cumbersome, many people happily key in vast amounts of information when using services such as Twitter, Facebook, or text messaging on their mobile devices. Such services are good examples of how seemingly poor interfaces will not stop people from using a much wanted service, as long as the return of their effort is evident. People who understand and trust the outcome of their journey are less likely to hesitate about wandering even down a difficult path. However evident the effort of typing on a mobile device might be, inputting data can take some time and can also become frustrating very quickly. Letting your users know almost instantly that they provide data in the wrong format, or that their username is already taken, is important. In the same way, a form can tell them where they are within the form, to make sure they don’t type the right data into the wrong field. Furthermore, portable devices are more likely to suffer from connection errors and slow connections than desktop devices. Client-side validation techniques, such as HTML5/CSS based or optimized JavaScript approaches, have proven to be advantageous in this case, as they reduce the amount of data transfer to easily allow UI enhancements while coping with less stable connections. But keep in mind when using JavaScript for form validation, that some mobile browsers (such as the Blackberry OS browsers—except of the most recent one), are not JavaScript enabled per default. Therefore, users who are unable or uninformed about how to change their settings will benefit from implementations following the concept of progressive enhancement. The less time users spend on retyping data or waiting for data to be validated the quicker and happier they will get through a form. Minimize Steps And Crossroads One of the biggest take-aways from the Keystroke-level model in form design is that navigating along interactive elements requires both physical as well as mental activity. This can have a severe impact, especially on a mobile phone, based on the natural way of interacting with a portable device. Every input field within a form requires users to scroll through it, understand its meaning, focus on it, and then provide the correct information. Due to the fact that people use their devices in a lot of different ways and these devices vary “greatly”, form elements that are spread over several input fields are prone to be rendered on a mobile device in a way unintended by the designers. As an example, during user testing sessions, I sometimes see users getting stuck on providing their phone numbers when having zoomed in on the form. The typical behavior is to enter their entire number into the first box provided for the area-code, completely missing the second input field. After submitting the form, they are puzzled about why there are two fields and the corresponding error message. When it comes to filling out forms on a mobile phone, I have observed many users running into a similar experience, merely less painful in its physical aspect. Many elements within a mobile form affect how smoothly users will get to a service or product hiding behind a form of any kind. There are several factors that can be considered to be stumbling blocks throughout the journey of filling out a form. Specifically on a portable device, this journey is complicated by the fact that we have to consider contextual parameters such as time, location, or limited input options, in comparison to a firm desktop experience. In this post we will look at the most common stumbling blocks for mobile devices. Moreover, I will discuss design strategies to avoid stumbling blocks and to facilitate a safe and quick stroll through forms for mobile users. Help Users Stay On The Right Path Some might say that elegantly designed forms can be compared to the likes of an efficient traffic system—as soon as you enter the road, you also enter a world of permanent and dynamic guidance that helps navigate you safely to your final destination. For example, the crosswalk signals tell you when it is okay to cross the street, just as the street signs signal the names of the streets that you are on. Street lights are also provided to help you navigate through difficult terrain in the dark. Keeping in mind your ultimate destination, you ultimately decide where to go, step by step. Road signs present your options and point out limitations. You can follow the traffic, take a short cut, or obey the navigation system on your phone. In this situation, comprehensible and timely feedback is vital. The same applies to mobile form design. Signposts and immediate feedback encourage users to complete a form. Although inputting data on a mobile device can be very cumbersome, many people happily key in vast amounts of information when using services such as Twitter, Facebook, or text messaging on their mobile devices. Such services are good examples of how seemingly poor interfaces will not stop people from using a much wanted service, as long as the return of their effort is evident. People who understand and trust the outcome of their journey are less likely to hesitate about wandering even down a difficult path. However evident the effort of typing on a mobile device might be, inputting data can take some time and can also become frustrating very quickly. Letting your users know almost instantly that they provide data in the wrong format, or that their username is already taken, is important. In the same way, a form can tell them where they are within the form, to make sure they don’t type the right data into the wrong field. Furthermore, portable devices are more likely to suffer from connection errors and slow connections than desktop devices. Client-side validation techniques, such as HTML5/CSS based or optimized JavaScript approaches, have proven to be advantageous in this case, as they reduce the amount of data transfer to easily allow UI enhancements while coping with less stable connections. But keep in mind when using JavaScript for form validation, that some mobile browsers (such as the Blackberry OS browsers—except of the most recent one), are not JavaScript enabled per default. Therefore, users who are unable or uninformed about how to change their settings will benefit from implementations following the concept of progressive enhancement. The less time users spend on retyping data or waiting for data to be validated the quicker and happier they will get through a form. Minimize Steps And Crossroads One of the biggest take-aways from the Keystroke-level model in form design is that navigating along interactive elements requires both physical as well as mental activity. This can have a severe impact, especially on a mobile phone, based on the natural way of interacting with a portable device. Every input field within a form requires users to scroll through it, understand its meaning, focus on it, and then provide the correct information. Due to the fact that people use their devices in a lot of different ways and these devices vary “greatly”, form elements that are spread over several input fields are prone to be rendered on a mobile device in a way unintended by the designers. As an example, during user testing sessions, I sometimes see users getting stuck on providing their phone numbers when having zoomed in on the form. The typical behavior is to enter their entire number into the first box provided for the area-code, completely missing the second input field. After submitting the form, they are puzzled about why there are two fields and the corresponding error message. When it comes to filling out forms on a mobile phone, I have observed many users running into a similar experience, merely less painful in its physical aspect. Many elements within a mobile form affect how smoothly users will get to a service or product hiding behind a form of any kind. There are several factors that can be considered to be stumbling blocks throughout the journey of filling out a form. Specifically on a portable device, this journey is complicated by the fact that we have to consider contextual parameters such as time, location, or limited input options, in comparison to a firm desktop experience. In this post we will look at the most common stumbling blocks for mobile devices. Moreover, I will discuss design strategies to avoid stumbling blocks and to facilitate a safe and quick stroll through forms for mobile users. Help Users Stay On The Right Path Some might say that elegantly designed forms can be compared to the likes of an efficient traffic system—as soon as you enter the road, you also enter a world of permanent and dynamic guidance that helps navigate you safely to your final destination. For example, the crosswalk signals tell you when it is okay to cross the street, just as the street signs signal the names of the streets that you are on. Street lights are also provided to help you navigate through difficult terrain in the dark. Keeping in mind your ultimate destination, you ultimately decide where to go, step by step. Road signs present your options and point out limitations. You can follow the traffic, take a short cut, or obey the navigation system on your phone. In this situation, comprehensible and timely feedback is vital. The same applies to mobile form design. Signposts and immediate feedback encourage users to complete a form. Although inputting data on a mobile device can be very cumbersome, many people happily key in vast amounts of information when using services such as Twitter, Facebook, or text messaging on their mobile devices. Such services are good examples of how seemingly poor interfaces will not stop people from using a much wanted service, as long as the return of their effort is evident. People who understand and trust the outcome of their journey are less likely to hesitate about wandering even down a difficult path. However evident the effort of typing on a mobile device might be, inputting data can take some time and can also become frustrating very quickly. Letting your users know almost instantly that they provide data in the wrong format, or that their username is already taken, is important. In the same way, a form can tell them where they are within the form, to make sure they don’t type the right data into the wrong field. Furthermore, portable devices are more likely to suffer from connection errors and slow connections than desktop devices. Client-side validation techniques, such as HTML5/CSS based or optimized JavaScript approaches, have proven to be advantageous in this case, as they reduce the amount of data transfer to easily allow UI enhancements while coping with less stable connections. But keep in mind when using JavaScript for form validation, that some mobile browsers (such as the Blackberry OS browsers—except of the most recent one), are not JavaScript enabled per default. Therefore, users who are unable or uninformed about how to change their settings will benefit from implementations following the concept of progressive enhancement. The less time users spend on retyping data or waiting for data to be validated the quicker and happier they will get through a form. Minimize Steps And Crossroads One of the biggest take-aways from the Keystroke-level model in form design is that navigating along interactive elements requires both physical as well as mental activity. This can have a severe impact, especially on a mobile phone, based on the natural way of interacting with a portable device. Every input field within a form requires users to scroll through it, understand its meaning, focus on it, and then provide the correct information. Due to the fact that people use their devices in a lot of different ways and these devices vary “greatly”, form elements that are spread over several input fields are prone to be rendered on a mobile device in a way unintended by the designers. As an example, during user testing sessions, I sometimes see users getting stuck on providing their phone numbers when having zoomed in on the form. The typical behavior is to enter their entire number into the first box provided for the area-code, completely missing the second input field. After submitting the form, they are puzzled about why there are two fields and the corresponding error message. When it comes to filling out forms on a mobile phone, I have observed many users running into a similar experience, merely less painful in its physical aspect. Many elements within a mobile form affect how smoothly users will get to a service or product hiding behind a form of any kind. There are several factors that can be considered to be stumbling blocks throughout the journey of filling out a form. Specifically on a portable device, this journey is complicated by the fact that we have to consider contextual parameters such as time, location, or limited input options, in comparison to a firm desktop experience. In this post we will look at the most common stumbling blocks for mobile devices. Moreover, I will discuss design strategies to avoid stumbling blocks and to facilitate a safe and quick stroll through forms for mobile users. Help Users Stay On The Right Path Some might say that elegantly designed forms can be compared to the likes of an efficient traffic system—as soon as you enter the road, you also enter a world of permanent and dynamic guidance that helps navigate you safely to your final destination. For example, the crosswalk signals tell you when it is okay to cross the street, just as the street signs signal the names of the streets that you are on. Street lights are also provided to help you navigate through difficult terrain in the dark. Keeping in mind your ultimate destination, you ultimately decide where to go, step by step. Road signs present your options and point out limitations. You can follow the traffic, take a short cut, or obey the navigation system on your phone. In this situation, comprehensible and timely feedback is vital. The same applies to mobile form design. Signposts and immediate feedback encourage users to complete a form. Although inputting data on a mobile device can be very cumbersome, many people happily key in vast amounts of information when using services such as Twitter, Facebook, or text messaging on their mobile devices. Such services are good examples of how seemingly poor interfaces will not stop people from using a much wanted service, as long as the return of their effort is evident. People who understand and trust the outcome of their journey are less likely to hesitate about wandering even down a difficult path. However evident the effort of typing on a mobile device might be, inputting data can take some time and can also become frustrating very quickly. Letting your users know almost instantly that they provide data in the wrong format, or that their username is already taken, is important. In the same way, a form can tell them where they are within the form, to make sure they don’t type the right data into the wrong field. Furthermore, portable devices are more likely to suffer from connection errors and slow connections than desktop devices. Client-side validation techniques, such as HTML5/CSS based or optimized JavaScript approaches, have proven to be advantageous in this case, as they reduce the amount of data transfer to easily allow UI enhancements while coping with less stable connections. But keep in mind when using JavaScript for form validation, that some mobile browsers (such as the Blackberry OS browsers—except of the most recent one), are not JavaScript enabled per default. Therefore, users who are unable or uninformed about how to change their settings will benefit from implementations following the concept of progressive enhancement. The less time users spend on retyping data or waiting for data to be validated the quicker and happier they will get through a form. Minimize Steps And Crossroads One of the biggest take-aways from the Keystroke-level model in form design is that navigating along interactive elements requires both physical as well as mental activity. This can have a severe impact, especially on a mobile phone, based on the natural way of interacting with a portable device. Every input field within a form requires users to scroll through it, understand its meaning, focus on it, and then provide the correct information. Due to the fact that people use their devices in a lot of different ways and these devices vary “greatly”, form elements that are spread over several input fields are prone to be rendered on a mobile device in a way unintended by the designers. As an example, during user testing sessions, I sometimes see users getting stuck on providing their phone numbers when having zoomed in on the form. The typical behavior is to enter their entire number into the first box provided for the area-code, completely missing the second input field. After submitting the form, they are puzzled about why there are two fields and the corresponding error message. When it comes to filling out forms on a mobile phone, I have observed many users running into a similar experience, merely less painful in its physical aspect. Many elements within a mobile form affect how smoothly users will get to a service or product hiding behind a form of any kind. There are several factors that can be considered to be stumbling blocks throughout the journey of filling out a form. Specifically on a portable device, this journey is complicated by the fact that we have to consider contextual parameters such as time, location, or limited input options, in comparison to a firm desktop experience. In this post we will look at the most common stumbling blocks for mobile devices. Moreover, I will discuss design strategies to avoid stumbling blocks and to facilitate a safe and quick stroll through forms for mobile users. Help Users Stay On The Right Path Some might say that elegantly designed forms can be compared to the likes of an efficient traffic system—as soon as you enter the road, you also enter a world of permanent and dynamic guidance that helps navigate you safely to your final destination. For example, the crosswalk signals tell you when it is okay to cross the street, just as the street signs signal the names of the streets that you are on. Street lights are also provided to help you navigate through difficult terrain in the dark. Keeping in mind your ultimate destination, you ultimately decide where to go, step by step. Road signs present your options and point out limitations. You can follow the traffic, take a short cut, or obey the navigation system on your phone. In this situation, comprehensible and timely feedback is vital. The same applies to mobile form design. Signposts and immediate feedback encourage users to complete a form. Although inputting data on a mobile device can be very cumbersome, many people happily key in vast amounts of information when using services such as Twitter, Facebook, or text messaging on their mobile devices. Such services are good examples of how seemingly poor interfaces will not stop people from using a much wanted service, as long as the return of their effort is evident. People who understand and trust the outcome of their journey are less likely to hesitate about wandering even down a difficult path. However evident the effort of typing on a mobile device might be, inputting data can take some time and can also become frustrating very quickly. Letting your users know almost instantly that they provide data in the wrong format, or that their username is already taken, is important. In the same way, a form can tell them where they are within the form, to make sure they don’t type the right data into the wrong field. Furthermore, portable devices are more likely to suffer from connection errors and slow connections than desktop devices. Client-side validation techniques, such as HTML5/CSS based or optimized JavaScript approaches, have proven to be advantageous in this case, as they reduce the amount of data transfer to easily allow UI enhancements while coping with less stable connections. But keep in mind when using JavaScript for form validation, that some mobile browsers (such as the Blackberry OS browsers—except of the most recent one), are not JavaScript enabled per default. Therefore, users who are unable or uninformed about how to change their settings will benefit from implementations following the concept of progressive enhancement. The less time users spend on retyping data or waiting for data to be validated the quicker and happier they will get through a form. Minimize Steps And Crossroads One of the biggest take-aways from the Keystroke-level model in form design is that navigating along interactive elements requires both physical as well as mental activity. This can have a severe impact, especially on a mobile phone, based on the natural way of interacting with a portable device. Every input field within a form requires users to scroll through it, understand its meaning, focus on it, and then provide the correct information. Due to the fact that people use their devices in a lot of different ways and these devices vary “greatly”, form elements that are spread over several input fields are prone to be rendered on a mobile device in a way unintended by the designers. As an example, during user testing sessions, I sometimes see users getting stuck on providing their phone numbers when having zoomed in on the form. The typical behavior is to enter their entire number into the first box provided for the area-code, completely missing the second input field. After submitting the form, they are puzzled about why there are two fields and the corresponding error message.

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